Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-settings.php on line 512

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-settings.php on line 527

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-settings.php on line 534

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-settings.php on line 570

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_PageDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1244

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_CategoryDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1442

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class wpdb in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 306

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/cache.php on line 103

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Object_Cache in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/cache.php on line 431

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/query.php on line 61

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/theme.php on line 1109

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Dependencies in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/class.wp-dependencies.php on line 31

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Http in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/http.php on line 61

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 204

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 342

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 551

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 2273

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 2495

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 2559

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/compatability.php on line 134

Strict Standards: Non-static method FeedWordPress::needs_upgrade() should not be called statically in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 135

Warning: session_start(): Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php:1266) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-automatic-upgrade/wordpress-automatic-upgrade.php on line 121

Warning: session_start(): Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-includes/comment-template.php:1266) in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-automatic-upgrade/wordpress-automatic-upgrade.php on line 121

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class ftp_base in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-automatic-upgrade/lib/ftp_class.php on line 56

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class ftp in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-automatic-upgrade/lib/ftp_class_sockets.php on line 8

Strict Standards: Non-static method FeedWordPress::stale() should not be called statically in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 203

Strict Standards: Non-static method FeedWordPress::update_requested() should not be called statically in /home/itectus/public_html/arch/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/feedwordpress.php on line 208
Arch.itect.us: architecture from the edge….

Mountain Home in Massachusetts Inspired by Fibonacci Spiral

Outdoor view of spiral - mountain home Massachusetts

Tsao & McKown Architects recently completed Berkshire Mountain House, a modern residence located in Alford, Massachusetts. The exterior of the residence is inspired by traditional farm houses in the region with a blended array of textures and hues, while glass is used extensively for connection with the outdoors.

“Nestled into the tree line at the top of a gentle rise, the house folds and unfolds to take advantage of sweeping panoramic views, and wraps upon itself to form an intimate courtyard against the forest’s edge,” the architects said.
Outside house with lawn - mountain home MassachusettsAn original layout defines the project, which has a total of three levels: “The building is conceived as movement through a Fibonacci spiral,” the architects explained. “The resulting plan allows a graceful progression through the rooms, spiraling up to the highest point, a cozy aerie.”

The living areas on the first floor consist of a series of open spaces for dining, entertaining or working. An abundance of wood finishes adds to the welcoming vibe, while well-placed artwork adds a pop of personality. [Photography by Eric Laignel]
Outside house with bedroom windows - mountain home Massachusetts Closeup of outside window detail - mountain home Massachusetts Front door entrance - mountain home Massachusetts Outside view of dining room - mountain home MassachusettsDining room interior at dusk - mountain home MassachusettsDining room and living room - mountain home MassachusettsDining room from living room - mountain home MassachusettsLiving room - mountain home MassachusettsFireplace and reading nook - mountain home MassachusettsHallway and staircase - mountain home MassachusettsOffice - mountain home Massachusetts Blueprints - mountain home Massachusetts

 

What’s your favorite feature of this Fibonacci spiral-inspired mountain home?

The post Mountain Home in Massachusetts Inspired by Fibonacci Spiral appeared first on Freshome.com.

Rooftop Terrace Tops Minimalist Family Home in Tokyo

Outside building at night - minimalist family home Tokyo

Swedish studio Elding Oscarson completed the design of Nerima House, a private residence located in Tokyo, Japan. Built as a weekend refuge for a couple and their grownup children, this minimalist family home features a surrounding small garden and rooftop terrace for ample opportunities to spend time outdoors.

The partially sunken ground floor accommodates a large bedroom with garden views, lavatory and storage room, while upstairs a spacious kitchen, dining and living rooms are organized in a single interior. Wrapped in glazing, the main living area offers a 360-degree panorama of the neighborhood. “The project was fairly unspecified, and rather than making a house with many small rooms, we opted for an open-plan concept,” the architects said.

Neighborhood street view - minimalist family home Tokyo

A simple color palette in white, complemented by wood accents makes the interiors feel airy and welcoming. Probably the most sought after part of the residence, the rooftop terrace ensures plenty of space for both relaxation and entertaining. [Photography: Kenichi Suzuki]
Building entrance - minimalist family home Tokyo Exterior of building during day - minimalist family home Tokyo Garden and stone path - minimalist family home Tokyo Bedroom - minimalist family home TokyoBathroom - minimalist family home TokyoStaircase - minimalist family home TokyoStaircase with curtains drawn - minimalist family home Tokyo Dining room - minimalist family home TokyoUpper landing with chair - minimalist family home TokyoRooftop terrace - minimalist family home TokyoSide garden and stone path - minimalist family home Tokyo First floor floorplan - minimalist family home Tokyo Second floor floorplan - minimalist family home Tokyo Rooftop terrace floorplan - minimalist family home Tokyo

What do you like most about the outdoor spaces incorporated in this minimalist family home?

The post Rooftop Terrace Tops Minimalist Family Home in Tokyo appeared first on Freshome.com.

Family Home Extension in Edinburgh Features Glass Walls

Outside expansion daytime - family home Edinburgh

This small semi-detached single-level house in Edinburgh, Scotland was recently renovated by David Blaikie Architects. The 731-square-foot home did not provide enough space, so the focus of the expansion was to increase the size of the living room and a build an additional small bedroom upstairs.

Thermally modified timber cladding for the roof and siding, steal frames and glass define the exterior of this family home. “The tall frameless glazed corner cantilevers out over the garden giving a lightness to the massing,” explained the architects at David Blaikie. “The extension is invisible from the street side of this semi-detached house, but explodes out of the rear elevation in a wholly unexpected way.”

Expansion interior of living space - family home Edinburgh

Function was the main consideration when planning the shape of this addition. “The extension and development of the attic space more than doubles the floor area of the house – all on a very tight budget,” the architects added. Living areas are illuminated from dusk till dawn, thanks to expansive windows ensuring a good flow of natural light.

The interiors pay tribute to Scandinavian design with white walls, wood cladding and colorful textiles, while clean lines and minimalist arrangements focus on functionality. [Photography by Paul Zanre]

Interior living space at dusk - family home EdinburghKitchen and dining room - family home Edinburgh Outside expansion at night - family home Edinburgh Close up of outside corner - family home Edinburgh Outside expansion at night - family home Edinburgh Floorplans of expansion - family home Edinburgh

What do you think of the glass wall expansion for this family home?

The post Family Home Extension in Edinburgh Features Glass Walls appeared first on Freshome.com.

Two-Story Glass Wall Makes Narrow Mexican Home Feel Huge

architecture modern residenceThis modern residence — recently completed by Taller Estilo Arquitectura — is cleverly adapted to its long and narrow site in Yucatán, Mexico. Even though the two-level Raw House is just 19 feet wide, the interiors feel airy and bright. How? It’s one part exposed raw materials. The concrete, wood and metal fixtures aren’t hidden under space-consuming layers of drywall.

It’s another part smart layout: the back of the house is a two-story glass wall (or is it a door?) that opens up the living spaces to a small courtyard with a swimming pool. Inside, the double-height lounge space just inside and the exposed stairway to the second floor both create the perspective of an “infinite” home.

modern residence (2)

The airy and bright feeling throughout isn’t by accident either: according to the architects, passive conditioning elements are an integral part of the design. The eastern wall of the home is also sliding glass that opes than an “air chimney,” that lets in natural light and makes it possible to control the flow and the volume of air even more precisely.  [Photography by David Cervera]

modern residence (6)
modern residence (3) modern residence (4) modern residence (5)
modern residence (7) modern residence (8) modern residence (9) modern residence (10) modern residence (11)

The post Two-Story Glass Wall Makes Narrow Mexican Home Feel Huge appeared first on Freshome.com.

A Book Lover’s Dream Home in Madrid

architecture new apartment

Studio Egue Y Seta transformed this 1950s dwelling in Madrid, Spain into a modern book lover’s dream. The residence consists of three rectangular-shaped floors topped by a gable roof and a small garden surrounds the entire house.

Inside, books abound. The living room seems like a miniature library. The custom-made solid wood bookcases that line the walls were recovered from the family’s previous home. The designers kept a bit of the home’s 1950s heritage — they suggest reading “while lying in one of the vintage armchairs from the 50s that flank the large chesterfield cognac leather sofa or when sitting around the superb dining table rescued from a disappeared nineteenth century French farmhouse.”

new apartment (2)

Another white bookcase reigns over the hallway on the top floor, with its impressive height. Next to it, there are plenty of spots to curl up with a book: the sofa, the butterfly chair, or up the metal ladder where there’s a hammock-style net suspended over the space. [Photography by Vicugo Foto]
new apartment (3) new apartment (4) new apartment (5) new apartment (6) new apartment (7) new apartment (8) new apartment (9) new apartment (10) new apartment (11) new apartment (12) new apartment (13) new apartment (14) new apartment (15)

Which design details do you like the most? 

The post A Book Lover’s Dream Home in Madrid appeared first on Freshome.com.

5 Ideas For Healthy and Green Living

The idea of healthy and green living has entered the mainstream — it impacts our diets, our work places, and now, of course, our homes. If you’ve been wondering how to make the right choices for both your family and the environment, look no further. We’ve searched and found five simple solutions that can help your home be a little bit more sustainable.

Sustainable house - green living

1. Choose Sustainable Systems

This is usually what people think of when they envision green living, but remember, sustainability doesn’t have to mean installing solar panels and living completely off the grid. On a smaller scale, selecting low-flow shower heads and energy-efficient appliances will also reduce your impact.

Those worried about the cost of implementing sustainable systems should also consider that the often offer long-term financial savings. A recent study from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that eco-friendly structures typically saved 15% in utility costs over their traditionally built counterparts.

Minimalist dining room - green living

2. Think Minimal

If one thing rings true about green living, it’s that less is definitely more. Gone are the days of stuffing a home to the brim with tchotchkes and clutter. Instead, today’s trendsetters are focusing on a much more minimalist aesthetic.

As for how to pull off a minimalist look, it’s all about putting function at the forefront. As you go through the rooms in your home, evaluate every item based on what purpose it serves in the space. Allow a few decor items to really bring forth your personal style, but don’t hesitate to clear away anything that just takes up space.

Kitchen with recycled materials - green living

3. Remember to Recycle

Reusing existing products is also a key component of green living. Before you decide to give away any surplus items in your home, we recommend trying to repurpose them in a new way.

For some, this means shifting wall hangings from one room to another. For others, it means undertaking a DIY project and turning an old dresser into a desk. But, whatever your flavor may be, don’t be afraid to take a step back and re-envision your things in a whole new way.

Dining room with natural materials - green living

4. Embrace Natural Materials

When it does come time to make a new purchase for your home’s interior design, you’ll want to choose natural materials whenever possible. This means, selecting design elements that come from renewable resources like wooden furniture, marble countertops or terra cotta floors.

Natural materials are a smart pick for a variety of reasons. Not only are they currently popular because of their green credentials, but they rarely fall out of style. If bought from the right vendor  such as a small business owner or even second-hand shop  it is often possible to get a better quality item at a lower price than the mass-produced version.

Glass-walled living room - green living

5. Let the Outside In

Lastly, it would be impossible to talk about being green without acknowledging that we should try to incorporate nature into our living spaces whenever we can. Ideally, we should strive to find ways to include natural elements indoors, as well as developing outdoor spaces. Consider foregoing window treatments in order to allow in plenty of natural light or investing in sizable sliding glass doors to allow the spaces to flow seamlessly. Smaller details like adding plants or fixing up a patio are also great solutions.

What’s the best way you’ve found to embrace green living?

The post 5 Ideas For Healthy and Green Living appeared first on Freshome.com.

Cozy Apartment in Bucharest Optimizes Space and Light

Living room with glass doors closed - Bucharest cozy apartment

Located in a newly built residential complex in Bucharest, Romania, this 538 square-foot home, named Apartment No. 3, optimizes space and light. Bogdan Ciocodeică & Diana Roşu teamed up to design a cozy apartment that offers both aesthetic harmony and functionality.

“Like with any other project, we tried to envision the owners’ daily paths, from the moment they step inside the apartment, until they go to bed at night,” the architects said. “We tried to make the space as comfortable as possible, to create a positive state of mind and that homey feeling everyone longs for.”

Living room with glass doors open - Bucharest cozy apartment

The layout is subtly divided in two, with the kitchen, dining and living spaces located on the left, and the bedrooms and bathrooms situated on the right. From the living room couch, one can see all the other areas of the house: the dining place, the bedroom and the kitchen.

Concrete, metal and glass are complemented by softer accents of wood and smooth white textiles to create a visual and textural balance. A metal-framed room divider separates the bedroom and living area, providing quality soundproofing, while the white curtains add a stylish, fluid touch to the overall design scheme. “We paid special attention to the interior lighting which adapted to every corner, creating a dynamic, stenographic atmosphere,” the designers added. [Photos by Radu Sandovici & Andrei Mărgulescu]
Living room view of front door - Bucharest cozy apartment Bedroom with glass doors closed - Bucharest cozy apartment Bedroom with glass doors open - Bucharest cozy apartment Bedroom with curtains drawn - Bucharest cozy apartment Living room from office space - Bucharest cozy apartment Office area with shelving - Bucharest cozy apartment Living room with kitchen doorway - Bucharest cozy apartment Glass doorway into kitchen - Bucharest cozy apartment Kitchen with window - Bucharest cozy apartmentMain living space from bedroom - Bucharest cozy apartmentClose up of bedroom glass door - Bucharest cozy apartmentCorner of bedroom with lamp - Bucharest cozy apartmentBedroom with curtains drawn - Bucharest cozy apartment Bedroom with curtains open - Bucharest cozy apartmentBathroom with sink - Bucharest cozy apartment Close up of bathroom with sink - Bucharest cozy apartmentBed with bedside lamps - Bucharest cozy apartmentApartment floorplan - Bucharest cozy apartment

 What do you think of the use of light and space in this cozy apartment?

The post Cozy Apartment in Bucharest Optimizes Space and Light appeared first on Freshome.com.

Nature-Inspired Home in Norway Accessible Only by Boat

Exterior of building with boat - Nature-inspired home Norway

Anchored to a rocky landscape in Larvik, Norway, this glass-walled home was especially designed as a weekend retreat for an interior architect, an artist and their two children. Designed by the architects at Lund Hagem, the site, accessible only by boat, is located within 16 feet of the water’s edge on a small island which boasts magnificent views.

The approximately 800-square-foot project named Cabin Lille Arøya is supported by stilts (solid galvanized steel columns built into the rock) and consists of two volumes. The lower volume accommodates the bedrooms and bathrooms, while the taller one shelters the kitchen, dining and living room. “The new volumes sit naturally with the existing landscape and allow for free circulation and use of the surrounding areas,” the architects said. “The building seeks to enhance the qualities of the site and make use of areas that originally had no value.”

Exterior of building with coastline - Nature-inspired home NorwayThe living room takes advantage of surrounding views thanks to floor-to-ceiling glass windows and doors. Concrete finishes were paired with wooden flooring and metal fittings, for a “raw” effect, in tune with the landscape. Wooden decks clad in pine span the length of the sleeping area with a stairway that can take inhabitants up to the roof. [Photography by Alexandre Westberg]
Water inlet leading to house - Nature-inspired home Norway Rocky cove - Nature-inspired home Norway Exterior of main living space - Nature-inspired home Norway Top exterior of building - Nature-inspired home Norway Side pine panels - Nature-inspired home Norway Outside view from interior - Nature-inspired home Norway Outside view of exterior rock wall - Nature-inspired home Norway Living room - Nature-inspired home Norway Bathroom - Nature-inspired home Norway Rock shower wall - Nature-inspired home NorwaySide deck - Nature-inspired home Norway

Lot blueprint - Nature-inspired home Norway

What is your favorite part of this nature-inspired island retreat?

The post Nature-Inspired Home in Norway Accessible Only by Boat appeared first on Freshome.com.

Unique UK University Drawing Studio Celebrates Light

Exterior of unique blue building - UK drawing studio
The new drawing studio at Arts University Bournemouth in Dorset, United Kingdom comes with a futuristic silhouette. Designed by renowned architect Sir Peter Cook and his office CRAB, the building celebrates “the fundamental nature of drawing and the way in which it stimulates thought”.

The 1830-square-foot creative studio is open to all artists in the university, from animators to costumes designers to architects and was built as a place especially for interaction and exchange. Central to the idea of drawing, “light” was chosen as the theme for the building’s design.
Interior students drawing - UK drawing studio

A rear clerestory window offers ample light with inspirational views of the tree canopies, while minimalist interiors in white and gray leave the room a blank slate. The oddly-shaped blue exterior is made from steel and was built in conjunction with two other facilities — an animation studio and a lecture theater.

“Through such simplicity, the act of drawing becomes a calm and considered activity within the lively world of a very busy and creative institution,” the project developers said. [Photography courtesy of CRAB Studio]

Students drawing in studio - UK drawing studio Exterior close up of clerestory window - UK drawing studio Back exterior of building - UK drawing studio Back exterior of building with walkway - UK drawing studioExterior at night - UK drawing studio

Do you think this space inspires creativity?

The post Unique UK University Drawing Studio Celebrates Light appeared first on Freshome.com.

Weekend Retreat in Australia Welcomes Climbers and Artists

Outside building with deck - Australian weekend retreat
Imagined as a weekend retreat in the Sydney Blue Mountains, Australia, Little Hartley House by Urban Possible addresses the living needs of two avid climbers — a professor and an art gallery owner. The single level, three-bedroom house features an artists’ studio, plenty of entertaining space and a sauna for after a day of climbing.

The public and private areas of the project were divided in two and connected by a butterfly roof. Potential bushfires dictated the use of tough materials, such as Corten steel, recycled blackbutt cladding and double glazing. “On the north eastern façade, a rhythm is set with repetitive Corten panels, interspersed with high pivoting doors,” the architects explained. “On the north, two tripartite sliding doors recess themselves behind the chimney leading occupants through to the entertaining deck.”
Back of building surrounded by trees - Australian weekend retreat
Every weekend, the residence (now transformed into a revolving art gallery) is filled with artists and climbers. All living spaces are minimalist with a focus on functionality and social interaction is encouraged by clusters of seating units spread throughout the residence, both inside and out. [Photos by: Tom Ferguson]
Front deck into living room - Australian weekend retreat Outside panels and doors - Australian weekend retreat Exterior corridor - Australian weekend retreat Living room and kitchen leading to deck - Australian weekend retreat Bathroom with large window - Australian weekend retreatExterior at dusk into bathroom - Australian weekend retreat

Is this a weekend retreat that you’d like to visit?

The post Weekend Retreat in Australia Welcomes Climbers and Artists appeared first on Freshome.com.